What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.

 What SIZE is it??

 If you have navigated to this page, you are interested in a collectable military uniform article (coat, trousers, hat, shoes, etc.) that I have for sale, but you need to know more about size measurements.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell collectable / historic uniforms by size!" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked these burning questions:

 
Why don't you post measurements?
Don't you understand that my purchase depends on the size???
   

 Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment.  It is undeniably great fun to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and thorny hedgerows at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even enjoy an explicit evening of 'Obergefreiter Fritz interrogates the naughty captured American WAC.'  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the "incredible importance" of their stated purpose which is normally described in such unassailable terms as "honoring our veterans", "educating the public", or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business; folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources - period.
   

 Let's back up a step.  I am a firm believer in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, well that's a damn shame... but as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it - well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling my antique furniture, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of my description, nor will I check on this data for any potential customer, regardless of how eloquently he describes the honorable purpose and educational significance of his intended bonfire.
 
 Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want the items to display and care for as a collectables; but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned these are not legitimate end uses for the item and further - not the purpose for which it is being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin", or any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this type of information in order to buy the item, I would frankly prefer that it sells to someone else instead who might have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.
 
 You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in my opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are indeed only useful as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for all new or reproductiuon items.
 
 You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is normally photographed in the course of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this in no way guarantees that original size tag or stamp is accurate.  If no tag or stamp is photographed, 99.9% of the time there is not one in the uniform.
 


 But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!
    

 Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with normal wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread which is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' (yes, that's what we call you) who stood at my tables at a show this past weekened, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, try to button the buttons, groan, and then move on to the next one.  When packing up, I found that at least two of these coats had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's selfish, careless disregard of historic WWII uniforms.  This stuff is old.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is incrementally degraded by wear.  Putting this stuff on and wearing it around truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.
  
 There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Now there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 23 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these resources, send me an email and I will be glad to forward you some recommendations.  (Sincerely - I mean that.  Let me know and I will gladly help.)
 

 Bottom Line:

 We choose not to sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso or mannequin form.  Further, we will not waste our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.... fine.  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as the result of someone trying them on.
 


 I'm OFFENDED!

 Fine, be offended.  Remember, the only reason why this page even exists is because people pestered the crap out of us, demanding that we explain ourselves in detail.  Actually, I think their motivation is to badger us and pick fights until we cave in and take a bunch of useless measurements for them.. but that's just a theory.  As long as the item belongs to me, I will market it in a manner that I believe to be appropriate and responsible.  If that does not match up with your needs, wants, desires, or fantasies as a buyer, don't be offended - just look elsewhere.  Pretty simple.

What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.
What SIZE is it?

If you are here, you have found an item listing that interests you, and the size question is important to you.  This page is here only because people have told us in the past that our simple declaration that "we do not sell by size" is just not good enough.  It seems that a more thorough, long, drawn-out explanation of our policy and the rationale behind it is required.  (Really?)  Well, ok - but only because we have been asked:

WHY???????  Don't you understand that we NEED to know the size???

Yes, I understand that you need to know the size if you plan to wear the garment, and that it is great fun it is to dress up for hanger dances, run through the mud and brambles at reenactments, march in parades, bob for apples at a Halloween party, or even an explicit evening of 'Gefreiter Fritz interrogates the captured American WAC."  I also understand that a great many folks have pursuaded themselves that wearing out original uniforms is ok because of the 'incredible importance' of their purpose, which normally is described as "honoring the veterans" or "bringing history to life."  With respect for and apologies to our friends in the vintage clothing business - folks, the consumptive use of artifacts is simply not responsible stewardship of our historic resources, no matter how eloquently someone might try to justify the practice.  

Let's back up a step.  We are firm believers in private property rights.  If you buy my antique furniture for use in a Guy Fawkes Day bonfire, that's a damn shame but  as long as your check clears it is really none of my business.  I would never even consider such a stupid act, but if you buy it.. well, then it is your decision to make.  However, when I am selling it, the rated combustible potential and ignition temperature of a walnut wardrobe will certainly not be part of the description.

Same goes for collectable military uniforms.  I know full well that (especially on eBay) a lot of the potential buyers do not want them to display and care for as collectables, but rather as costumes, fashion, playthings, marital aids, etc.  As with burning antique furniture - if that's your thing, baby, so be it.  None of my business.  However, as far as I am concerned that is not a legitimate end use for the items and not the purpose for which they are being sold.  As such, I do not feel inclined to measure "pit to pit", "cuff to shoulder", "navel to noggin" or to any other such specification.  In fact, if you really need to know this in order to buy it, I frankly would prefer that the item sells to someone else entirely who may have a more responsible and respectful purpose in mind for it.

You will see exceptions in our listings.  From time to time we get items that have (in our opinion) no real historic or collector value, and are useful only as costumes, fashion, playthings, shop rags, etc.  If for some reason we should find ourselves selling 1980's Air Force BDU jackets, then by all means expect to find size as a prominent part of the description.  Same goes for reproduction items.  

You will also see that if there is a size tag or contract stamp in the item, it is photographed as part of documenting the details of the uniform for the listing.  It might even be mentioned in the text of the description.  HOWEVER, this does in any way guarantee that this original tag or stamp is accurate.

But wearing original uniforms doesn't hurt them!

Really?  Go look in your closet.  Some stuff holds up quite well and for a long time, but the simple fact of the matter is that new stuff looks better than old worn stuff.. because clothing deteriorates with wear.  This is especially true for clothing that has an inherent weakness, such as cotton thread that is more than 65 years old.  As I write this, I am reminded of a 'Size Queen' customer who stood at my tables at a show this past weekend, trying on each and every WWII AAF officer's coat that I had.  He would try it on, flex his shoulders, frown, and move on to the next one.  When I was packing up, I found that at least two of these had new 'blow outs' in the back seams due to this clown's actions.  Thread gives way, buttons pop, and cloth is generally degraded by wear.  Wearing this stuff truly is a consumptive use of artifacts.

There was a day when originals were the only choice, but that has long since passed.  Today there are some great folks making truly outstanding reproduction uniforms.  Better yet, they understand that their target audience is normally quite a bit larger than the physically-fit 19 to 20 year old kids that have marched off to war throughout history.  If you really want something to wear and are not familiar with these sources, send me an email and I will be glad to send you some recommendations.

BOTTOM LINE:

We choose not sell historic or collectable uniforms by size.  If there is a size tag and it was photographed or mentioned in the listing - so be it.  However, we specifically do not guarantee original markings to be accurate, or that these items will fit or even be serviceable for wear beyond a normal collector's static display on a torso form.  Further, we will not be wasting our time taking detailed measurements of items.  If this means that you are not willing to purchase the item.. so be it!  This is probably the best thing for all concerned.

Returns for reason of size will not be accepted, nor will items that are clearly damaged as a result of someone 'trying them on'.

If size is your thing - take no offense - we have nothing against you.  We simply do not elect to participate in that aspect of the market for historic or collectable uniform items.